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The Feast of the Annunciation

March 25, 2020
By Memorial Lutheran School
Homily for the Feast of the Annunciation
Wednesday of Lent IV
Memorial Lutheran Church and School
Pastor Paul
 

In the name of Jesus. Amen.

It’s the day many of you have been waiting for, but you didn’t even know it. Do you know what today is? It is nine months until…Christmas! That’s right. If it hasn’t been on your mind recently, it should be now. Today is March 25, the twenty-fifth day of the third month of the year. In nine months, it will be the twenty-fifth day of the twelfth month of the year, December 25.

Now before you get your hopes up, there are no presents to download today. Today is about the true meaning of Christmas. It is the day that we celebrate the day when Mary, the Mother of our Lord, found out that she would be the Mother of our Lord. As the readings make clear to us, God had determined to save mankind by being born of a woman, in a unique way. Jesus, the savior of the world, would have God as his Father and a virgin, Mary, as his mother. He would be God with Us, Immanuel. He would save his people from their sins. He would be the Son of David, but his reign would be eternal.

The Annunciation teaches us a number of important Christian lessons. The first is that God chose to save the world by causing his Son, the Lord Jesus, to take on human flesh first as a baby. Remember Adam? We have no baby pictures. He was created as a man. Jesus, the redeemer of the world, and the Bible calls him the “second Adam.”  If we had pictures from that time, he would have baby pictures. God took on flesh and did so first as an infant in the womb.

Secondly it teaches us about the humility, that is the humble nature, of Mary, the mother of God. It was a miraculous thing, that she would be the mother of God. It was a crazy thing. Who would believe it? However Mary did. She trusted in God and rejoiced that she was chosen to be the theotokos, the God bearer.

Lastly it teaches us that God is not afraid to be with us. He comes to be with us, to live with us, to die for us and to share with us his eternal life. God is not a God who is far off. God is with us. He is still “Immanuel,” God with us. Jesus still comes to us with his flesh and blood in the Lord’s Supper. Jesus still comes to us through preaching to comfort and sustain us with the bread from heaven.

Nine months are left until once again we put up our trees and sing Christmas carols. Don’t forget in the meantime that every day we can rejoice that our Lord Jesus became man and died for our sins. Don’t forget that throughout the year, even when it still seems so far away, it is important to remember that God became man to save man. And the greatest gift of all, regardless of the season or the month is that he did it.

God bless you and keep you as you learn at home.

In the name of Jesus. Amen.